Physical Symptoms

How to Stop Anxiety Stomach Pain & Cramps

Micah Abraham, BSc

Written by

Micah Abraham, BSc

Last updated November 6th, 2020

How to Stop Anxiety Stomach Pain & Cramps

Anxiety is a complex disorder, and one that can have a profound effect on one’s body, not just one’s mind. The stress that anxiety puts on your body can lead to a host of different issues. One of the more common among them is stomach pain.

Stomach pain, stomach cramping, and intestinal discomfort that is hard to describe can all be the result of persistent anxiety.

Diagnosing Anxiety-Related Stomach Pain

Stomach pain caused by anxiety is difficult for doctors to diagnose because the pain and indigestion are still real physical responses – the same type of responses from your body that would occur if you had a physical or organic health issue.

If the stomach pain is severe or accompanied by fever or other symptoms, it’s certainly a good idea to visit a doctor. But anxiety can genuinely cause stomach pain in a way that can lead to indigestion.

Examples of Anxiety-Related Stomach Issues

There are numerous issues caused by anxiety that could cause various types of discomfort in the abdomen. Some examples are:

  • Abdominal Tension: Stress tends to cause a great deal of tension in the abdomen. That tension can tire out abdominal muscles and cause an internal feeling of discomfort.
  • Digestion: Stress affects hormone levels, and hormones are used to aid digestion. When you’re stressed, it can lead to hormonal imbalance, resulting in indigestion that may lead to bloating, intestinal pain, and more.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Anxiety has been found to be one of the most likely causes of irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS. IBS occurs when your body’s digestive system is functioning poorly without a definite underlying cause; it can cause altered bowel movements and abdominal discomfort.

Anxiety also releases a stress hormone (cortisol), which causes the body to produce extra levels of stomach acid. That acidity causes the lining of the esophagus to become irritated, and this can lead to stomach pain, nausea, and vomiting, and in severe cases, stress-induced ulcers. These are just a few of the ways that anxiety can cause pain or negative stomach sensations.

Can Stress Cause Stomach Pain?

Anxiety and stress are closely related. But they are technically different conditions. It is possible to experience a significant amount of stress without experiencing anxiety. Yet the causes of stomach pain from stress are similar. Muscle tension, digestive issues – all of these are also caused by stress and may contribute to stomach pain.

How Do I Know if It’s Anxiety and Not an Ulcer?

It’s not uncommon to find yourself concerned that your struggle with stomach pain is not from anxiety or stress at all. For example, you may find yourself concerned that instead of anxiety, what you are really struggling with is an ulcer.

Only a doctor can diagnose whether or not your pain is from an ulcer, but there are some clues. The clearest signal is if you have any blood in your stool or acid burps (if you also have acid reflux). That’s often a clear sign of an ulcer. Also, if the pain or discomfort tends to occur after eating and isn’t related to a similar condition, GERD (heartburn/acid reflux), it’s possible you may have an ulcer.

However, this is complicated by the fact that ulcers can be caused by long-term stress and anxiety, as they stimulate the production of extra stomach acid. This excess acid in the stomach breaks down the gastric or intestinal lining and cause open wounds that may harm your health.

Stomach Pain and Long-Term Health

Because of the extra acid in your stomach and the changes to the way your body processes nutrients, the stomach pain from anxiety can be a problem if left untreated. Ulcers are just one example. Some people experience heartburn from anxiety, and others eat less often, giving their body fewer nutrients.

The stomach pain from anxiety and stress is rarely dangerous, but it is still important to treat it, because the effects on your long-term health when it is left untreated may be harder to manage.

When Is Stomach Pain Most Likely to Occur?

If you have anxiety, stomach pain can occur at any time – even when no anxiety is present. However, many people experience stomach pain during panic attacks.

The exact link between an anxiety attack and stomach pain is not clear, other than the fact that during a panic attack, your body is under a considerable amount of stress, and your hormones are often on overdrive. Also, those with anxiety attacks are prone to hyperventilation, which may lead to symptoms that create stomach pain. 

Are There Foods That Reduce Stomach Pain?

Anxiety-related stomach pain is not usually the result of your diet (although a poor diet and sedentary lifestyle may increase the risk of anxiety), so there aren’t necessarily any dietary changes that can help reduce stomach pain.

That said, those with panic attacks are more prone to experiencing more severe stomach discomfort, even when no anxiety is present. In other words, when you have panic attacks, it’s possible to have stomach pain even without a panic attack.

Also, those with anxiety attacks and severe anxiety are prone to what’s known as “over-sensitization.” That means that they are more likely to notice and feel smaller, normal changes in the body, and these can trigger an anxiety attack. So if your diet does contain foods that cause you gas, stomach discomfort, or mild indigestion, it may be best to avoid them because the slight amount of discomfort could feel worse than it should and may trigger a panic attack.

That’s why healthy eating is important in those that get stomach pain with anxiety. Make sure you’re getting:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Water/Hydration
  • Whole-Grain Carbohydrates

Also, if you suffer from stress-induced hyperacidity, then it is recommended that you consume dairy products and non-spicy foods. In moderate amounts, over-the-counter antacids may be needed as well.

In addition, if possible, try to avoid eating until you’re too full. Those with severe anxiety sometimes interpret the “full” feeling as pain, and this could trigger a panic attack and further pain.

Wide Range of Symptoms

One of the more surprising issues with some types of anxiety disorder is the way that they change sensations in our body. For example, for many, feeling full is a nice feeling. However, it can lead to a variety of natural body sensations, including:

  • Feeling lightheaded
  • Slight stomach discomfort
  • Fatigue

In those without anxiety, these are natural. In people suffering from some degree of anxiety, those sensations feel much more pronounced and can trigger a full-blown panic attack.

How to Relieve Stomach Pain Symptoms

There isn’t necessarily a cure for the stomach pain symptoms themselves. When your body is under stress, your stomach tends to hurt based on the acids in your stomach and the foods you’ve already eaten. If you have stomach pain as a result of an anxiety attack, you may need to wait it out.

Water can help a little, however. So consider sipping cool (but not too cold) water. Antacids may also be beneficial in some cases, but if you have stomach pain often, you may not want to depend on antacid treatments.

Questions? Comments?

Do you have a specific question that this article didn’t answered? Send us a message and we’ll answer it for you!

Ask Doctor a Question

Question:

Where can I go to learn more about Jacobson’s relaxation technique and other similar methods?

– Anonymous patient

Answer:

You can ask your doctor for a referral to a psychologist or other mental health professional who uses relaxation techniques to help patients. Not all psychologists or other mental health professionals are knowledgeable about these techniques, though. Therapists often add their own “twist” to the technqiues. Training varies by the type of technique that they use. Some people also buy CDs and DVDs on progressive muscle relaxation and allow the audio to guide them through the process.

Ask Doctor a Question

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